Exploring Predictors of Computer Science Outcomes among Underrepresented High School Students of Color

Presented at the 2018 American Education Research Association (AERA) Conference, this study examined demographic, academic, and social/psychological predictors of computing outcomes. Study findings reveal: (a) gender differences in computing engagement and aspirations but not in competency, (b) prior CS exposure predicts gains in engagement, (c) the presence of CS role models is a significant predictor, regardless of gender, of CS …

Data Brief: Women and Girls of Color in Computing

The Kapor Center has partnered with the Center for Gender Equity in Science and Technology at Arizona State University to launch the Women of Color in Computing Researcher/Practitioner Collaborative (https://www.wocincomputing.org). This data brief outlines the participation of women of color across the computing pipeline. View Report

The Leaky Tech Pipeline: A Comprehensive Framework for Understanding and Addressing the Lack of Diversity across the Tech Ecosystem

This report introduces the Leaky Tech Pipeline Framework, explores data on underrepresentation and barriers to diversity, and provides a roadmap for comprehensive interventions and solutions to increase racial and gender diversity across the tech ecosystem. Check out the report below:   View Report

Computer Science in California’s Schools: 2016 AP CS Results and Implications

The Kapor Center for Social Impact and the Alliance for California Computing Education for Students and Schools (ACCESS) released a policy brief detailing disparities in Advanced Placement Computer Science A test taking in California and the nation. Key findings of the policy brief include: Only 0.5% of the 1.9 million public HS students in CA took AP Computer Science in …

Computer Science Access for Students of Color: Disparities and Opportunities

“This presentation, given to the 2015 California Department of Education STEM Symposium in San Diego, CA (October 29, 2015), explored disparities in Computer Science course access in California high schools with highest proportions of: underrepresented students of color, low-income students, and English language learners. These findings, part of the Path Not Found report released earlier in 2015, were accompanied by …

Path Not Found: Disparities in Access to Computer Science Courses in California High Schools – CSTA Golden Gate Chapter presentation

The findings of the “Path Not Found:Disparities in Access to Computer Science Courses in California High Schools” were presented and discussed at the Computer Science Teachers Association Golden Gate chapter meeting (June 28, 2015). The research illuminated the disparities in access to any computer science courses for underrepresented students of color, low income students and English language learners in California …

Path Not Found: Disparities in Computer Science Course Access in California High Schools

Given the rising demand for skilled computer science professionals in California, it is vital that the state’s public schools provide all students with a solid foundation in computer science coursework. However, California’s school system is failing to prepare its students—particularly low-income students and students of color—for the technology jobs of the future. Path Not Found: Disparities in Access to Computer …